Person That is Sober Living in Boston Massachusetts

Sober Living in Massachusetts

So you’ve decided to get sober and now you’re hearing the term “ Sober Living ”. Maybe you’re in a treatment center or detox facility. Maybe a friend or family member is suggesting sober housing as an alternative to living at home. So what is it like? This is my story about how living in a sober house changed my life.
In 2007, I decided that my life had become unmanageable and that I didn’t want to continue living the way I had been. Everything about my life had become centered on the next drink and drug. I had designed my career to accommodate my addiction, and all of the things that were important to me fell short of booze on my priority list. After entering treatment, I began to hear about “Aftercare” and “Continuing Care”. These were terms for the work that I would continue to do in order to maintain my sobriety, after treatment ended. This is where I first heard of living in a sober home.

Living a Sober Life on My Own

After deciding that I was fully capable of maintaining my own sobriety without someone else “controlling my life”, I decided against a sobriety house, and chose to move in with friends from my treatment center instead. While my intentions were sincere, my conviction to stay the sober path was soon challenged.

I was faced with many temptations, intense emotions, and unanticipated life struggles. What I had imagined to be an easy path to walk in my newfound sobriety became a dangerous tip toe through a wild jungle. Before the end of 8 months, I had relapsed, and things got bad… fast!

I had heard that when you drink again, you “pick up where you left off”. This was certainly the case for me as I found myself ready to leap from the 17th floor of my apartment building- only a higher power could have kept me alive through the events to follow. It took me more than a year to get back into treatment.

Getting Sober Again

Returning to treatment in 2009, I vowed to do things differently. I spent 90 days in residential treatment and decided to move close to my treatment center in Los Angeles, where I had begun to build a sober community and fellowship. As I approached the end of treatment, a sober home was suggested for me. But again, I was reluctant to give up control and live with strangers. Besides, I had heard that sometimes people actually used in sober livings!

I would move out into my own home, but near my community, I decided. Within six months, I found myself back in crisis, lost in desperation, and far from the sober way I had envisioned.
After completing a 3rd visit to residential treatment, I was beaten. I knew then that my decisions were not serving me. I decided to trust others, and I accepted that an aftercare plan may need to include this off-putting concept: living in a sober house.

The Reality of Sober Living

I arrived at my new sober living house in September of 2010. I quickly discovered that my mind’s concept of a controlling environment with supervision and strict management was very different from what I entered into that day. I wasn’t supervised, I was supported. I wasn’t controlled, I was given suggestion. When I made a choice, it was my choice, and what I learned in the following months taught me how to make good choices for myself. My house manager, Joe, told me “I can’t get sober for you dude. This is your journey… I’m just here to help you find your way”. Joe would quickly become a mentor and friend, offering much needed advice about everything from work to women. I made many friends that year, some who are still close to me today. I thought I would be giving up my free will… instead, I was learning how to reclaim it.

Tharros House

Fast forward to 2016 where I now sit, writing this blog in the office of Tharros House, my own High Standards Structured Sober Living home in Lexington Massachusetts. With 8 current clients who are learning to walk a great path, all desiring a different life than they are leaving behind, I am struck by how different I thought it would be those years ago when I entered Joe’s house in Los Angeles. I experienced many new things through the people I met and the opportunities I was afforded in sobriety. I found a way to live life that is far happier than I ever had before the drinking or drugs began.

I am now grateful for my addiction! Without it, I wouldn’t have the life I have today, nor would I have learned how to live the way I do now, with great meaning and joy. At Tharros House, my team and I work with only 10 clients at a time to ensure that we provide the support and suggestion that can help each individual design their own successful recovery. Each client at Tharros House learns to apply the tools from treatment in a way that is both fun and effective. Clients participate in sober events and learn to have fun while living sober in the city of Boston. Our team is here to help each person find their way.
Learn more about what a sober living home can offer for you. You deserve a joyous and meaningful life, and the right support and guidance can help you find your way. Visit us at www.TharrosHouse.com to learn more about Tharros House in Lexington, MA.

Woman in yoga clothes meditating to battle addiction in park.

Does Meditation Help with Addiction?

Meditation has been found to support addiction recovery since it can help you feel calm, cope with triggers, and ultimately, help you to avoid a relapse. Although meditation cannot wholly replace a full addiction treatment program with professional medical support, it can still be a helpful tool.

Many rehabilitation facilities include mindfulness and meditation as therapy techniques. Whether you are currently battling an addiction, in treatment, or have been sober for many years, practicing meditation can be incredibly beneficial for your recovery.

What is Meditation?

Meditation is a mind and body activity that is intended to promote feelings of calmness and relaxation. It can also help people improve their well-being and cope with illnesses.

You can begin meditating by sitting comfortably in a quiet environment. Next simply and effortlessly notice your thoughts as they come and go, allowing internal and external distractions to pass by without assessing them. Meditation may also involve deep and purposeful breathing during times of stress.

There are two main types of meditation. These types include guided meditation and unguided meditation. To practice guided meditation, a trained meditation or mental health professional will guide you through the session and work with you. Unguided meditation simply refers to meditation that is practiced on your own.

How Does Meditation Help Someone with an Addiction?

For those dealing with drug and alcohol addictions, everyday stressors can be challenging to cope with and may even contribute to a relapse. Multiple studies have concluded that mindful meditation can reduce certain symptoms like anxiety, depression, poor sleep, and drug cravings. Meditation can also help people feel more aware of their thoughts and have better control over their emotions.

Compassion with Meditation

As you begin to simply allow thoughts and distractions to come and go, you may notice all kinds of wanted and unwanted thoughts / emotions. This is completely normal. It is important to keep an open mind no matter what comes up, and understand that there are people everywhere experiencing very much the same thing.

By sitting and allowing without getting involved, it is allowing your mind and body to activate its natural healing capabilities. Much of the excess thoughts and feelings are simply reverberations of past experiences, so this sitting meditation allows all of the noise to pass by. At first it may seem daunting, but as with anything, practice makes perfect.

Sober Living at Tharros House

Tharros House is a sober living community located near Boston, Massachusetts. Sober living communities are a great place for sober individuals to thrive and continue working on their sobriety among peers who share similar goals. Contact us today so that we can help you decide if our sober living community is right for you.

Man with cloud of cigarette smoke wondering if he is addicted to something.

How Do I Know If I Am Addicted to Something?

People can enjoy many pleasurable activities in a healthy way that does not cross the threshold of addiction. However, sometimes the line between healthy enjoyment of an activity and developing an addiction to it can be crossed without someone even realizing it.

What Is an Addiction?

The American Society of Addiction Medicine defines addiction as a chronic disease that impacts the brain’s motivation, reward, and memory functions. A person with an addiction will feel as though they crave that substance—and may even ignore other areas of their life in order to fulfill their desires and support their addiction.

What Are Some Typical Signs of Addiction?

While addiction may be hard to recognize at first, there are some indicators of addiction that everyone should be aware. This may help you notice it as soon as possible in order to turn it around. Some signs of addiction include:

  • An inability to stop engaging in a behavior or using a substance
  • Lack of control
  • Decreased socialization and neglecting relationships
  • Ignoring risk factors, such as sharing needles even though there could be severe health consequences to doing so
  • Physical effects, such as experiencing withdrawal symptoms

For someone with an addiction, it can be challenging to recognize that the addiction exists and take steps to overcome it. Many addicts will continue to find ways to continue and justify their behavior. It can be beneficial and even life-changing for supportive people in their lives to get them help if they begin noticing these signs of addiction.

Tharros House Sober Living Home

Tharros House is a sober living home that can be found in the Boston, Massachusetts area. Sober living homes are an excellent option for people who have gotten sober and wish to maintain their sobriety and live among other sober individuals. Contact us today at Tharros House in order to learn more about how we can help you continue and strengthen your sobriety.

How Do I Stay Sober?

It takes hard work and dedication to recover from a substance use disorder. For many people, it will require a lifetime of dedication to stay on the sober track.

Unfortunately, relapses are common. Approximately 80% of those in recovery who have found long-term sobriety have experienced at least one relapse along the way. Staying sober is challenging for many people, but the more strategies you learn to identify triggers and cope with stress, the easier it can be to prevent a relapse.

Identify Your Personal Triggers

External triggers can be people, situations, places, and things that elicit cravings or thoughts associated with substance abuse. Internal triggers are thoughts, feelings, or emotions that are associated with substance abuse.

Identifying both your external and internal triggers can help you remain sober. When you know what could cause or contribute to a relapse, you can then create a plan to avoid or prepare for these triggers.

Build Healthy Relationships

An essential part of the recovery process is building healthy relationships. As someone newly sober, you may have noticed that some of your past relationships were unhealthy or even toxic. You may need to make changes with many relationships in your life, including cutting ties or limiting contact with people with whom you used to partake in substance abuse.

It can be beneficial to work on improving relationships with supportive friends and family. You can also join support groups and find peers that are also working hard to maintain their sobriety.

Sober Living at Tharros House

Tharros House is a sober living facility located in the Boston, Massachusetts area. Sober individuals who want to maintain their sobriety and reside in a collaborative living environment are an excellent fit for Tharros House. Contact us today to learn more about how Tharros House can help you continue and strengthen your sobriety.

Chart for Substance Abuse Statistics in Massachusetts

Substance Abuse Statistics in Massachusetts

If you have recently beat a substance abuse addiction, you may be wondering about what the latest statistics show about substance abuse and recovery. If you live in Massachusetts, the state website can be a good resource to learn about these statistics.

Statistics on Substance Abuse in Massachusetts

The State of Massachusetts tracks the number of residents who seek help for substance abuse. These statistics include a breakdown of gender, race, age, and other factors. This information can be useful to watch for trends and find ways to intervene in groups that are the most at risk. The latest available data on the state website is for the year 2017.

Types of Abused Substances

In the year 2017, there were 98,944 total admissions for treatment for substance abuse. Heroin was the most common substance for which Massachusetts residents sought treatment, making up 52.8% of primary reasons for admittance. Alcohol was the next most common primary substance, with 32.8%. Other reasons for admittance included substance abuse of cocaine, marijuana, stimulants, and opioids.

Other Categories of Statistics

The same set of data also included a breakdown of substance abuse-related admissions for treatment according to gender, age, and race. In 2017, of those seeking treatment for substance abuse, 67.8% were male, and 32.2% were female.

The age group of 31-40 had the most people seeking treatment, making up 30.9% of the total. The next highest age group was from 26-30, which made up 21.7% of the total.

In 2017, 77.1% of those seeking treatment for substance abuse were white. African American individuals made up 7.3% of the total, while 6.3% were multi-racial. 9.3% of those seeking treatment identified as “other.”

The Tharros House is a sober living home in Massachusetts where you can learn the necessary tools to live a sober life and make friends with other like-minded people on a similar path. This living environment is proven to promote sobriety and healthy habits to help make living a sober life more fun and less stressful.

Contact us today to learn more about how we can help you.

Cigarettes of an addict

How Do I Know If I Am Addicted to Something?

It can be difficult to recognize when something has become an addiction.

According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), addiction is defined as a chronic disease that affects the brain’s memory, motivation, and reward functions.

A person with an addiction will experience feelings of craving that substance. In many cases, those with addictions may ignore other parts of their life in order to support or fulfill these addictive needs.

What Are Common Signs of an Addiction?

There are some commonly recognized signs of addiction that everyone should be aware of. These signs include:

  • Lack of control
  • Inability to stop engaging in the behavior or to stay away from a substance
  • Physical effects such as withdrawal or requiring higher dosages
  • Ignoring risk factors like sharing needles
  • Decreased socialization such as ignoring relationships or abandoning commitments

Typically, a person with an addiction will exhibit one or more of the above signs. The degree of intensity for each of these signs tends to depend on how long they have been battling the addiction.

Recognizing Addiction

When a healthy person notices a negative behavior, in many cases, they are able to get rid of it. However, this is not the case with someone who has an addiction.

Someone with an addiction will often find ways to justify and continue their behavior rather than admit that they have a problem. With real addiction, if it is left untreated, it can increase a person’s risk of illness or develop into a debilitating habit.

If you become aware that you are dealing with an addiction, it is essential to seek help right away.

After you have begun the recovery process, you can also look into sober living homes such as the Tharros House to live in to retain your sobriety.

Challenges and Rewards of Staying Sober

If you have recently achieved a state of sobriety after overcoming addiction, you already know how rewarding that can be. While staying sober may have its challenges as time goes on, the rewards will only keep getting better. Knowing about some common challenges that sober individuals may face can help you be better prepared to face them head-on.

Challenges of Staying Sober

You may face some challenges when working to stay sober if you continue to spend time with old friends with whom you drank or abused substances. It can be easy to fall back into old habits, so moving on from these friendships may be in your best interest.

Another challenge to your sobriety can happen if you do not properly manage your physical and mental health. Addiction can take a very serious toll on a person, both physically and mentally.

As you begin reacclimating back into society as a sober person, be sure to prioritize all aspects of your health. This is an important way to maintain your sobriety and remain a healthy individual.

Rewards of Staying Sober

While you will likely face some challenges to your sobriety along the way, the rewards of staying sober are worth the effort. You may quickly notice your overall health improving due to conquering your addiction.

As you focus on your sobriety, you may also have the opportunity to repair important relationships in your life with friends and family. This can be incredibly rewarding and beneficial to your life in so many ways—healthy relationships are a great support system.

Becoming sober can improve your physical and mental health, as well as the quality of your life in general.

If you are looking for a transition home to live in to maintain your sobriety, contact the Tharros House today. The Tharros House is a highly rated sober living home located in Massachusetts.

Friends for Accountability

How Does Accountability Help with Staying Sober?

Holding yourself accountable in life can help tremendously in maintaining your sobriety. It helps you add the necessary structure to your life to achieve your goals and build a better life for yourself.

Sobriety and Accountability

Having family, friends, and counselors in your life who hold you accountable for your actions can be very helpful. These people can help a person in recovery keep their focus on what matters and to stay on track with their sobriety.

During a person’s recovery process, it is important for them to work toward an addiction-free life with good health and positivity. Accountability plays a crucial role in this recovery success. Without having accountability, a recovering addict will not be able to recognize their faults and take responsibility for their actions.

Accepting accountability will help to provide the tools that you need to stay sober. Accountability can also help people maintain their motivation throughout the recovery process.

Why a Lack of Accountability Can Be a Problem

It is not uncommon for people who are struggling with drug or alcohol abuse to place the blame for their actions and behaviors on the substances that they have been using.  Some people use their addiction as an excuse to avoid dealing with certain emotions.

The recovery process forces people to face these behaviors and emotions head on to begin healing. Failure to take accountability for your own actions can only hurt you in the long run, ruining relationships and leading to bad decisions.

Sober living homes can help people in recovery remain accountable for their actions. These homes also often have strict rules and regulations to assist you in building a better life for yourself.

To learn more about sober living homes and what they can offer, contact the Tharros House today at (617) 249-1087.

Group of friends looking out into the sun outside of a sober living home

How Do I Know If a Sober Living Home is Right for Me?

If you are committed to remaining sober and want to work toward becoming more independent, a sober living home may be the right choice for you. Sober living homes are group residences, where people who are recovering from addiction can live.

Life in Sober Living Homes

Sober living homes typically require that their residents follow certain rules. One of the most serious rules that must be followed is that residents must remain sober. Other common rules include a mandated curfew and a ban on any form of violence. Different sober living homes have different rules; however, the main goal is to provide structure and responsibility for residents.

Residents living in a structured environment tend to have a better chance at lasting recovery. Sober living homes allow residents to adjust to life and its responsibilities both during and after treatment. Many residents opt to reside in sober living homes while they make the transition from rehab to independent living.

Thriving in a Sober Living Home Environment

A sober living home is a great residence for someone who has completed inpatient rehabilitation and feels almost ready to live independently. Sober living homes provide independence in many aspects, but also serve as a helpful community.

Job searching is encouraged for residents, and on-site job training programs are available at some homes. Some homes also offer transportation for their residents so that they can more easily get back to work. If you feel ready to go back into the workforce and begin the steps necessary to reacclimate into society, a sober living home may be the right choice for you.

If you are thinking about moving into a sober living home, contact us at the Tharros House today at (617) 249-1087. The Tharros House is a sober living home for men that is located in the Boston, Massachusetts area.

Importance of Structure for Addiction Recovery in Massachusetts Squares

Why is Structure So Important for Addiction Recovery?

You have likely heard that structure is an important aspect of addiction recovery. The importance of structure for addiction recovery cannot be overstated. Structure helps to treat the underlying issues that contribute to addiction.

Structure Helps Treat Addiction Behaviors

When people suffer from an addiction to drugs or alcohol, they have developed certain behaviors and ways of thinking. Whether they realize it or not, these behaviors and ways of thinking enable their addictions and discourage healthy habits.

Many addicts who seek treatment choose to because their lives have become too difficult and unmanageable due to their addictive behavior. When someone has an addiction, it becomes hard for them to prioritize things other than obtaining and using the addictive substance.

For this reason, their addiction causes them to create new habits that are stronger than their old ones. The new habits and compulsions cause their lives to become more chaotic and disordered. Sober living homes often focus on providing structure back into the lives of residents. This structure helps to put a former addict onto a path toward healthier habits, thoughts, and actions.

Structure Helps Combat Stress and Anxiety

Many people who struggle with drug dependency have dealt with a lot of uncertainty. They may have even faced dangerous and risky situations. With a structured and safe recovery program, these individuals can remove some of the pressures from the outside world. They can now feel at ease to begin the hard work of self-reflection.

Structure Promotes Long-Term Recovery

Addiction can cause long-term changes in the brain that affect behavior, attitudes, and thinking habits. It is not easy to simply change these patterns. To continue with sobriety, a sober person must apply what they learned in recovery treatment to a long-term lifestyle.

One way to do this is to live in a sober living home. The Tharros House in Massachusetts offers many benefits to its residents. Contact us today on our website or call (617) 249-1087 to learn more.

sober living home hourglass in Massachusetts with Sun Shining

How Long Should I Stay at a Sober Living Home?

Many people decide staying in a sober living home is a great way to maintain their sobriety. If you are considering sober home living, you may be wondering how long you should stay there.

There are many benefits to staying in a sober living home. Studies have shown that time living in a sober living home has a positive impact on rates of employment, sobriety, and relapse prevention. Sober living home residency has also been associated with a decrease in incarceration.

Factors That Determine How Long You Should Stay in a Sober Living Home

The exact length of time that you should stay in a sober living home will vary depending on the person and their unique situation. You should make the decision based on what you feel is best for you and your sobriety after taking in all of the factors.

One of the biggest factors in determining the length of stay is your financial situation. Some sober living homes can be expensive, so you will have to consider your financial needs.

Another factor that impacts the length of your stay in a sober living home is your willingness to follow the rules. Sober living homes often have strict rules and guidelines in place. Residents must follow these rules to continue living there.

Even if following rules is difficult for you, you may find that staying in a sober living home helps improve this and brings much needed structure to your life.

Some sober living homes offer their residents job training programs. These programs help residents prepare themselves for long-term recovery and independent living.

If you wish to learn more about sober living homes to determine whether it is the right step for you, contact the Tharros House today. The Tharros House is a sober living home for men in the Boston, Massachusetts area. You can give us a call at (617) 249-1087 to schedule a tour or visit.